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Planning Your Genealogical Road Trip


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Planning Your Kentucky Research Trip


This page is directed to all you genealogical 'distance researchers' who have never visited the place where your ancestors grew up. You've finally made the commitment to board that plane, train or automobile and take the long-awaited sentimental journey. Good for you!

To add depth to your trip, you really should plan some time away from the research centers. It will put perspective on your family's life experiences to see where your ancestors lived. And, touring notable historical sites in the area helps to put your research in its historical context. Kentucky offers a wealth of them.

Get touring ideas for all of Kentucky from the Kentucky Tourism official website.

City of Augusta, KY tourism webpage, with information for the visitor to Augusta, Kentucky

Side Trips to Historical Sites

Explore the Kentucky On-Line links to museums throughout the Commonwealth.

Here is a selected list of historical sites and accommodations, most within 20 miles of Augusta or Brooksville...an easy drive.

  • Albert Sidney Johnson House - Washington 503 S Court St Bluegrass Heartlands Description: The birthplace of this famous Confederate general, a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, who was killed in the Battle of Shiloh (1862) while leading a charge against General Grant's men. The museum recreates the family home with period furniture, photos and documents. Phone: 606-759-7411.
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  • Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park - MOUNT OLIVET PO BOX 66 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: The newest jewel in the crown of the Kentucky State Park System, Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park is the perfect location for an educational getaway. The park features a lodge, restaurant, museum, gift shop, miniature golf, and lots more outdoor recreational opportunities at the Historic site of Kentucky's only Revolutionary War Battle. Features: 32 Rooms, 2 Suites, Restaurant, Outdoor Pool, Game Room, Meeting Room, Playground, 57 Improved Sites, Electric, Water , 2 Cottages/Condos URL: www.bluelicksbattlefield.com E-mail: bluelicks@mail.state.ky.us Phone: 859-289-5507, 800-443-7008.
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  • Cane Ridge Meeting House & Barton Warren Stone Mus - PARIS 1655 CANE RIDGE RD Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Built in 1799 of blue ash logs, the Cane Ridge Meetinghouse still stands today and is said to be the largest one-room log structure still in existence. Now protected by a stone superstructure, the meetinghouse is open to visitors during regular hours spring through fall. There is also a musuem on the grounds that contains early photos and artifacts. The Cane Ridge Meetinghouse was recently the site of a 'Great Gathering' to recognize the 200th anniversary of the 'Great Revival' held at Cane Ridge in 1801 and said to be the largest camp meeting ever held on the frontier, attracting as many as 20,000 people. E-mail: canerdgmtg@aol.com Phone: 859-987-5350.
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  • Colville Covered Bridge - Paris North of Paris On KY 3118 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: One of only 13 covered bridges left in the state, the Colville bridge was built in 1877. (history)
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  • Flemingsburg Historic District - Flemingsburg Hwy 32/11and 57 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Nearly 200 homes and commercial buildings are included on the National Historic Register. Union soldiers occupied the Baptist Church and burned pews and fences for heat. Antique shops. Phone: 606-845-1223.
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  • Georgetown & Scott Co Museum - GEORGETOWN 229 E MAIN ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: history museum URL: members.aol.com/scottcomuseum/museum2000g.htm Phone: 502-863-6201
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  • Harriet Beecher Stowe Slavery To Freedom Museum - WASHINGTON PO BOX 184, OLD MAIN ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: The early antebellum home where Harriet Beecher visited and witnessed a slave auction in 1833. Preservationists are returning this home to the era she visited along with displays of slave history. Phone: 606-759-4860
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  • Hawkins-Kirby House - WARSAW 105 E MARKET ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: This house was built circa 1845 by Edmond Waller Hawkins, a lawyer from Spotsylvania County, Virginia. During the civil war, Hawkins was appointed by President Lincoln, Judge Advocate of the Northern Kentucky District. From this he received the title mayor. In 1868 the house was sold to Captain William H. Kirby who was a noted riverman. The house was given to the Gallatin County Historical Society in 1983 and restored to its present condition. Please call for an appointment but do not call after 7pm. Phone: 859-567-4591
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  • Hopewell Museum - PARIS 800 PLEASANT ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Housed in the historic 1909 Beaux Arts-style Paris post office, Hopewell Museum was founded in 1994. The museum features changing exhibits on the art and history of Bourbon County and central Kentucky. E-mail: hopemuse@KYK.net Phone: 859-987-7274
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  • Jailer's Home & Dungeon - Carlisle 121 W MAIN ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Home built 1820-24, dungeon cells built 1857 and housed prisoners in the 1850-1890's. Friday 10-4 or by appointment. Phone: 859-289-5174
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  • John Fox, Jr. Genealogical Library - PARIS 323 HIGH ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: One of the finest genealogical libraries in the state. It holds an impressive and unique collection of historical/genealogical books. Phone: 859-987-1788
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  • Johnson Creek Covered Bridge - Mt. Olivet KY 1029 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Built in 1874, this 131 foot Smith truss-designed bridge is no longer in use. (history)
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  • Kentucky History Center - FRANKFORT 100 W BROADWAY ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: A 167,000 square-foot museum and research facility. Hands-on activities, interactive exhibits, and dynamic collections. Contains unique genealogical records for tracing Kentucky ancestors. (crafts, history, multicultural, motorcoach) URL: www.kyhistory.org Phone: 502-564-1792, 877-4HISTORY
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  • Kentucky Living History Farm - LEXINGTON 6031 RUSSELL CAVE RD Bluegrass Heartlands Description: See, hear, touch and smell what Kentucky farmers experience year round at this working farm. Join in on spring wheat cutting and rolling, spring planting, summer fertilizing, fall cutting and housing of tobacco, cattle tending, and fence mending. Phone: 859-293-9367.
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  • Kentucky Military History Museum - FRANKFORT E MAIN ST AT CAPITOL AVE Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Located in the Old State Arsenal, the museum's displays include impressive collections of firearms, edged weapons, artillery, uniforms, flags and personal equipment. Guided and special tours available when booked in advance. (civil war, history) Phone: 502-564-3265.
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  • Kentucky State Capitol - FRANKFORT 300 CAPITOL AVE Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Guided tours. Reservations for groups suggested. Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Saturday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm, Sunday 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm. Guided tours will be given on the hour and half hour on weedays and on the hour only on weekends. One of the most beautiful capitols in the country. Completed in 1910 in the Beaux Arts design. Also contains the First Lady Doll Collection. (history, heritage) Phone: 502-564-3449.
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  • Mason County Museum - MAYSVILLE 215 SUTTON ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Exhibits at the Mason County Museum, in a building completed in 1881 as the public library and expanded into the 1951 public library building next door, re-create the story of this pioneer gateway from pre-history to the present. Includes extensive history and genealogy library and art gallery. URL: www.masoncountymuseum.org E-mail: masonmuseum@ntr.net Phone: 606-564-5865.
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  • National Underground Railroad Museum - MAYSVILLE 115 E 3RD ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Documents Maysville's role in the abolitionist movement. Phone: 606-564-9411.
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  • Old Washington Visitors Center - Washington Main St Bluegrass Heartlands Description: This 1785 village, now on the National Register, was an outpost for pioneers traveling the Buffalo Trace. Enjoy a film at the visitor center and special events. Phone: 606-759-7411.
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  • Paxton Inn - Washington 2030 Old Main Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Build around 1810 by James A. Paxton, a local attorney and ardent abolitionist, was a safe house for escaping slaves. According to oral history, the slaves sat on the narrow staircase hidden next to the kitchen fireplace until they could safely be moved across the river to Ohio. Phone: 606-759-7411.
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  • S.A.R. Historical Museum - LOUISVILLE 1000 S 4TH ST Bluegrass Heartlands Description: The national headquarters of the Sons of the American Revolution Historical Museum features a continuing program of acquitions for display, ranging from objects related to the U.S. as it emerged as a new nation to artifacts of the Revolutionary War and Early American decorative arts. (genealogy, heritage) Phone: 502-589-1776.
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Food and Accommodations Within 20 Miles of Brooksville



  • The Augusta Pub - 120 MAIN STREET AUGUSTA KY 41002 - Phone 606-756-9910

  • Augusta General Store - 109 MAIN STREET AUGUSTA KY 41002 - Phone 606-756-2525

  • Bravo's Cafe - 121 MAIN STREET AUGUSTA KY 41002 - Phone 606-756-2727. Bravo's features sandwiches, wraps, fresh salads, soups of the day, and homemade desserts. It is set to open under new ownership (December 2012).

  • Chandler's Beehive On The River - AUGUSTA 101 W RIVERSIDE DR AUGUSTA - Phone 606-756-2202. The newly reopened (2012) restaurant in the former Beehive Tavern locale is a partner restaurant with Chandler's in Maysville, Ky. See the reviews for the Maysville location to know what to expect at the Augusta location. Situated in a historic inn located along Augusta's riverfront.

    Thanks to Mary Ann Ashworth for providing the above 2012 update on eatery options in Augusta.

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  • Best Western Maysville Inn - MAYSVILLE 1428 US HIGHWAY 68 # A Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Best Western Maysville Inn is five years old, located at the intersection of Hwy 68 and AA Hwy. Features: 52 Rooms, 2 Suites, Continental Breakfast, Smoking Phone: 606-759-5696, 800-528-1234
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  • Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park - MOUNT OLIVET PO BOX 66 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: The newest jewel in the crown of the Kentucky State Park System, Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park is the perfect location for an educational getaway. The park features a lodge, restaurant, museum, gift shop, miniature golf, and lots more outdoor recreational opportunities at the Historic site of Kentucky's only Revolutionary War Battle. Features: 32 Rooms, 2 Suites, Restaurant, Outdoor Pool, Game Room, Meeting Room, Playground, 57 Improved Sites, Electric, Water , 2 Cottages/Condos URL: www.bluelicksbattlefield.com E-mail: bluelicks@mail.state.ky.us Phone: 859-289-5507, 800-443-7008
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  • Corner Cafe - Augusta 214 Hamilton Ave Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Cafe and Bar (food) Phone: 606-756-3219
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  • Doniphan House - Augusta 302 E Fourth St Bluegrass Heartlands Features: 4 Rooms, 2 Bathrooms, F Breakfast, Smoking Phone: 606-756-2409
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  • Forest Retreat - CARLISLE 4179 MAYSVILLE RD Bluegrass Heartlands Description: This bed and breakfast is in the historic home and final resting place of Kentucky's tenth governor (Thomas Metcalfe). Furnished in period pieces. Full service restuarant in a beautiful setting, plus antiques and crafts for sale. Features: 4 Rooms, 2 Suites, 4 Bathrooms, Restaurant, full Breakfast Phone: 859-289-4444, 800-220-6840
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  • French Quarter Inn - Maysville 25 E McDonald Pkwy Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Every room in this luxurious river front hotel comes with a jacuzzi tub. The quaint lobby bar and gourmet eatery provide a very romantic getaway spot. Features: 64 Jacuzzi Suites, Restaurant, Meeting Room, Bar, Smoking Phone: 606-564-8000, 800-966-9892
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  • Hickory Sticks Golf Club - California P.O. Box 165, Painter Rd, KY 2921 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: 18 hole golf course Features: Public, 18 Holes, 71 Par, 6148 Yardage URL: www.hickorysticks.com Phone: 859-635-GOLF
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  • Jane's Riverview B&B - Augusta 206 E Riverside Dr Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Visit this quaint B&B on charming Augusta's riverfront. Features: 1 Rooms, 1 Bathrooms, full Breakfast, Reservations Required URL: www.visitaugusta.net E-mail: jjwachs@hotmail.com Phone: 606-756-2050
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  • Laurel Oaks Golf Club - MAYSVILLE 808 US HIGHWAY 62 Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Rolling fairways, sloping greens, 3 lakes come into play. Features: 18 Holes, 72 Par, 6512 Yardage Phone: 606-759-5011
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  • Parkview Country Inn - AUGUSTA 103 W 2ND ST Bluegrass Heartlands Features: 9 Rooms, 2 Suites, 9 Bathrooms URL: www.parkviewcountryinn.com E-mail: parkviewinn@hotmail.com Phone: 606-756-2603
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  • Ramada Inn - MAYSVILLE 484 MOODY DR Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Full service hotel, tennis. Features: 116 Rooms, Restaurant, Outdoor Pool, Meeting Room, Bar, Smoking Phone: 606-564-6793, 800-272-6232 Super 8 Motel - MAYSVILLE 550 TUCKER DR Bluegrass Heartlands Description: Easy access to all area attractions. Features: 44 Rooms, 2 Suites, continental Breakfast Phone: 606-759-8888, 800-800-8000
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  • White Rose B&B - AUGUSTA 210 W RIVERSIDE DR Bluegrass Heartlands Features: 4 Rooms, 2 Bathrooms, Breakfast, Reservations Required, Smoking Phone: 606-756-2787
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Tips for a Successful Research Trip - What to Know Before You Go

  • Get to Know the Repositories - At home, familiarize yourself with the holdings of each record repository you plan to visit. This information is available from record survey books such as Ancestry's Red Book1,¬†Kentucky Genealogical Research2, or The Handy Book for Genealogists3. You will not have time to thoroughly research at every repository, so arrange your schedule to visit the most relevant ones first.
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  • Consider Their Calendar - Call ahead, even if you know the scheduled hours for a library, county clerk, or other record repository. Academic libraries sometimes close when out-of-session. Remodeling, broken equipment, a local holiday, or a scheduled event may close the facility on the very day you planned to visit. Often, record repositories will restrict entry to a private school or study group. For example, the John Fox, Jr. Library (NSDAR) in Paris, Kentucky sometimes closes, even when the published schedule says otherwise, because the DAR ladies also use the historic Duncan Tavern for private meetings and luncheons. Specialized or very small libraries are usually staffed by volunteers, and may even open by appointment only. It's just like visiting friends: You will get a warmer reception when they know you're coming.
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  • Have a Work Plan - You need focus. Otherwise, you may be overwhelmed by the choices available to you in the record center or county clerk's files. Before you leave, review and prioritize your research objectives and brick walls. Make a list of specific action steps you will take toward each objective. By objective I do not mean, 'Find all eight of Grandpa's great-grandparents.' That is your goal, and it's far too broad to attain in a single research visit. An example of an objective list is: 'Find the marriage record for Grandpa and Grandma Jones, look for Great-Uncle Thaddeus' will, and get a copy of the deed for Great-Grandpa Smith's farm.'

    You may organize your objectives and their action steps in a variety of ways. One approach is to visit all the local repositories with a focus on finding everything about a single ancestor. This approach requires the self-discipline to ignore entries pertaining to other members of your family tree. Resist getting sidetracked or you will not accomplish your objective. Another approach is to set up residence at a single repository and do a thorough survey of all records for every surname of interest to you. If you choose this approach, it's the repositories that you must prioritize, based on their research potential.
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  • Take Along the Family (...Group Sheets, that is!) - For security and to prevent theft, many research centers do not allow patrons to bring personal files into the research rooms. Boil down that 3-drawer file cabinet of genealogical notes to their essence (names, dates, locations) on a few family group sheets that you can take as references right into the research rooms.
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When You Arrive

  • Take Along the Family - This time, I'm not talking about your ancestral family, but your present one. If your spouse, mother or friend accompanies you on the trip, by all means put them to work. Inexperienced researchers can quickly learn to do index searches. If you know dates of death, family members come in very handy to scan microfilmed newspapers for obituaries.
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  • Budget Your Time - Few researchers have time or resources to spend long periods traveling and living in hotels. Do set up a daily schedule for yourself...and stick to it.
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  • Have a Big Breakfast - Your task is much too important to stop for something as mundane as a growling stomach. Load up at breakfast each morning. You can usually make it through the day and net an extra hour of research time. If you simply can't go that long without food, take along a power bar for a quick lobby break. This tip is not recommended for those with diet-related health problems.
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  • Make It Midweek - Some libraries and historical societies are open on weekends. My suggestion: Leave weekends for the local working people. If possible, arrange your schedule to visit the popular research centers on weekdays. You'll get better service, and a place to sit. Use the weekends to drive around the ancestor's old digs, soak up the local flavor, and visit the cemeteries.
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  • Focus on Frankfort - If you are planning your first research trip, or want to survey several counties without moving around, this is the place to make your hub. The Frankfort area has the greatest concentration of Kentucky resources to be found, in the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives (KDLA) and the new Kentucky History Center, the home of the Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) and Kentucky Genealogical Society (KGS).
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  • Get Local - On the other hand, O Efficient Researcher That You Are, you have completed your general records survey with resources available at your local LDS Family History Center or genealogical library. It's now time to get into the holdings of those county clerks' offices and local libraries for the remaining records not yet committed to microfilm by either the National Archives or the Genealogical Society of Utah (LDS).
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  • Like a Good Scout, Be Prepared - To protect their holdings, many libraries and records centers do not allow patrons to bring pens into the research rooms. It is very difficult to conduct research without a writing implement. Bring along several sharpened pencils with erasers.

    Let's say you just found Great-Great Grandpa's will file. In it is a complete inventory of his estate and sale, and a subsequent lawsuit against the heirs over land he inherited from his grandparents in the state where they lived. It's a genealogy goldmine! But it's twenty pages of materials. Nothing tops the frustration of stopping work, and possibly being required to re-shelf the file, while you run around looking for change to operate the photocopy machine. You'll thank me for this tip: Bring coin rolls of dimes and quarters.
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  • Know the House Rules - Where may you park? Is your laptop OK? Must you leave your belongings in a locker or unsecured storage recess? Can you exit and re-enter freely? Can you pull records yourself or must you wait for an employee to do it? Is there a coin-operated photocopier? May you make your own copies or must staff do it? Will you have access to rare collections or must you make requests of staff?
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  • Learn Graveyard Etiquette - City Person! If you're going to visit old rural graveyards, the first thing you need to know is that they are usually on private property. Most owners are accustomed to strangers stopping by, and they are usually most accommodating. As a courtesy, however, always look for the likely owner's house and ask permission before you set out across a farmer's newly planted field. Also be aware that some graveyards are poorly maintained. Dress appropriately and expect to encounter tall weeds, barbed wire, insects, the farmer's bull, and-yes-snakes.

    You may be tempted to make a graphic record of ancestors' tombstones. Taking rubbings is an especially popular technique, but improper procedures can do serious damage to a tombstone. If the condition of the stone's engraving is good, the best record-taking tool is the camera, followed closely by just writing down the words. If you really must get tactile with the tombstone, take along the right materials for the simple but non-toxic techniques discussed at this site: The Association for Gravestone Studies spacer
  • Get Chatty With the Locals - Don't be shy. Tell everyone you meet why you are visiting the area. Mention surnames. Many rural and small townspeople have roots in the area that go back many generations. They may know exactly where your ancestor lived, recall the old folks' gossip, or even be a shoestring cousin. Regardless, these encounters are guaranteed to enrich your experience.
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1 Alice Eichholz, Ph.D., C.G., ed. Ancestry's Red Book
858 pages, 8 3/4 by 11, hardbound
ISBN 00-916489-47-7
#202…$49.95 (ARC $44.95)

Providing county and town listings within an overall state-by-state organization, Ancestry's Red Book is the result of the collective efforts of a host of professional researchers—all experts in their particular fields of research—and state archivists and their staffs. This book contains information on the holdings of every county in the United States, providing a virtual what's what of genealogical resources in every state and the District of Columbia. Ancestry's Red Book also gives a thorough explanation of identifying record jurisdictions. For example, jurisdictions in the Midwestern states are typically based in the counties, but in the New England states are based primarily in the towns. This book sets the standard for resource identification.
2 George K. Schweitzer, Ph.D., Sc.D., Kentucky Genealogical Research
1983, 154 PAGES, soft cover
Self-published

This little booklet is a condensed survey of Kentucky record holdings organized by county. It's small size makes it handy to carry on research outings. Available at most LDS Family History Centers. 3

George B. Everton, Sr, ed., The Handy Book for Genealogists
hard cover
Published by The Everton Publishers, Inc., Logan, Utah

This book summarizes county formation from parent counties, county record holdings, and county seats for the entire United States and many European countries.Available from Evertons.


Some Bracken County Historical Site Markers

See historical site markers for all of Kentucky at the
Kentucky Historical Society website.

A Foster Inspiration (Marker Number: 750) County: Bracken Location: Frankfort & 5th Sts., Augusta, KY 8 Description: Stephen Collins Foster, as youth, visited here, May 1833. His uncle Dr. Joseph S. Tomlinson was then President of Augusta College. The musical, harmonious voices from the old Negro church on the hill floated softly over the town. 'It can hardly be doubted' Foster was impressed by these since he 'put into song at a later time the sorrow their voices reflected.' Augusta College 1822-1849 (Marker Number: 94) County: Bracken Location: Augusta College Grounds, KY 8, 19 Description: In 1822 the trustees of Bracken Academy with conferences of the Methodist Church of Kentucky and Ohio merged to found Augusta College, the first established Methodist College in the world. (Subjects: Methodist) Augusta in Civil War (Marker Number: 501) County: Bracken Location: Augusta, KY 8 Description: By Sept. 1862, 6,000 Union troops had gone from this district. Only 100 Home Guards left, under Col. Bradford. On Sept. 27, Col. Duke with 350 Morgan Raiders attacked. Guards secreted in houses fought until Raiders penetrated area, burned and cannonaded houses. CSA losses of men and ammunition forced return to Falmouth and abandonment of raid into Ohio. (Subjects: Civil War | Morgan's Raiders) Bracken County Wine (Marker Number: 1213) County: Bracken Location: Augusta, KY 8, 19 Description: During the 1870s, leading wine-producing county of US, furnishing over 30,000 gallons annually, half the entire national production. Germans, finding soil here similar to that in France and Spain, brought grape cultivation and wine production to this area. This last remaining wine cellar has 3-foot-thick walls of native limestone and a vaulted ceiling. (Subjects: Germans) Bracken County, 1796 (Marker Number: 861) County: Bracken Location: Augusta, KY 8 Description: Formed from parts of Campbell and Mason. Named for William Bracken, hunter, fisherman, Indian fighter, came here 1773. Birthplace of John Gregg Fee, founder of Berea College, 1855. Birthplace and home of Dr. Joshua Taylor Bradford, 1819-71, world famous surgeon. Site Augusta College, first Methodist College in world, 1822. First White Burley tobacco, 1867, from Bracken seed. (Subjects: Berea College) Casto-Metcalfe Duel (Marker Number: 996) County: Bracken Location: Bracken Co. on Mason Co. line, KY 8 Description: On the Ohio River shore near here one of the last duels fought in Kentucky under the 'code duello' took place on May 8, 1862, between William T. Casto, former Maysville mayor, and Col. Leonidas Metcalfe, U.S. Army, son of former Gov. Thomas Metcalfe. Colts rifles were used at 60 yards. On the first fire Casto was mortally wounded. Metcalfe was not hit. Cause of the Duel - The duel (see other side) climaxed a bitter Civil War episode. In Oct., 1861, Metcalfe was ordered to arrest 7 men, including Casto, for aiding the Confederates. They were sent north to Union prisons; all were later released, Casto in Feb., 1862. His belief that Col. Metcalfe was responsible for his arrest led Casto to challenge him to duel which ended his own life. (Subjects: Civil War | Duels) Founder of Augusta (Marker Number: 1502) County: Bracken Location: Powersville, KY 10 & 19 Description: Captain Philip Buckner, Revolutionary War soldier, gave 600 acres of land to establish Augusta in 1797. He received many land grants, one in present Bracken County, for service as Commissary Officer in Va. Capt. Buckner was member of 2nd Ky. Constitutional Convention, 1799; represented Bracken Co. in Legislature. Lived at 'Woodlawn' many years; died here in 1830. (Subjects: Constitutional Convention (1799) | Revolutionary War) Kenton Ambushes Indians (Marker Number: 1614) County: Bracken Location: Foster, KY 8 Description: In summer of 1793 Indians crossed Ohio River, hid canoes at mouth of Holt's Creek, site of Foster, and proceeded to Bourbon Co. to steal horses. Simon Kenton secured a small group to ambush them on their return. After lying concealed for four days, Kenton's men were successful; they killed six of the enemy, scattered the others, and retrieved the horses. (Subjects: Creeks | Indians | Kenton, Simon | Rivers) Philip Buckner (1747-1820) (Marker Number: 1842) County: Bracken Location: Augusta Public Square Description: Captain Philip Buckner, an Englishman, was a Revolutionary War veteran. He came to Va., served adopted colony as issuing commissary, received extensive land grants, then settled here. In 1797, he donated this lot for Augusta Public Square as part of land for town. It became the site of the courthouse until it burned, 1848; pioneer jail still standing. (Subjects: Revolutionary War) Walcott Covered Bridge (Marker Number: 1565) County: Bracken Location: 5 mi. N. of Brooksville, KY 1159 Description: This scenic bridge, also known as The White Bridge, is a 75-foot span over Locust Creek and has served Walcott community from 1824-1954. It is of King and Queen type, timber truss construction with hand-hewn joints and beams. First restored by A. L. Murray. Bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, 1975. Covered Bridges - Covered bridges were first built in the 1790s but did not become widely popular until after 1814. They were covered to protect them from the weather. At one time there were more than 400 covered bridges in Ky. The timbered spans have played a romantic role in our history. Some were destroyed during the Civil War. The remaining ones are a nostalgic link with the past. (Subjects: Covered Bridges | National Register of Historic Places)



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