Kentucky: A History of the State
Perrin, Battle & Kniffin 2nd ed., 1885, Hopkins Co.
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Darby
Wyatt
DR. A. G. DARBY, Hopkins County, was born August 25, 1839, in Caldwell County, Ky. He is a son of F. W. and Mary (Wyatt) Darby. The father was born in North Carolina, and when young came to Caldwell County and soon after engaged in teaching school; he later engaged in agricultural pursuits, and at the time of his death in 1858, was one of the most extensive and prosperous farmers in the county, leaving an estate valued at about $90,000. The mother was born in Caldwell County and is now living at Princeton, at the advanced age of seventy-eight. Our subject was reared on his father's farm and received a good literary education. At the age of twenty-two he was employed as overseer, later he opened a grocery store at Fredonia, Ky.; this he continued one year, and then opened a drug store, which he carried on about five years; his health became poor and he took up the study of medicine; in 1870 he attended the Louisville Medical College; the following year he came to Dawson, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession.
Daves
Davis
Robinson
Jones
Riggin
WILLIAM T. DAVES was born in Hopkins County, Ky., December 31, 1843, and is the eldest of nine children born to Randolph and Sarah J. (Robinson) Daves. The former a native of North Carolina and the latter a native of the "Old Dominion," both of English descent. Randolph Daves, at about the age of eleven, in 1830 came with his parents to Henderson County, Ky., then almost an unbroken wilderness. There his father bought military lands, erected a rude log cabin, and subsequently improved a farm. After attaining his majority, Randolph bought a farm in Henderson County, Ky., there he remained eight years. He then sold and came to Hopkins County, Ky., where he has at different times owned three or four different farms. For the last eighteen months he has resided in Madisonville. For the last fourteen years he has been nearly blind, having lost his sight from the effects of neuralgia in the head. He and wife are devoted members of the Baptist Church. William T. remained on his father's farm until he was twenty-five years old. In 1862 he was conscripted for the Confederate service, was never mustered and consequently saw no active service. After the war he engaged in farming in Hopkins County for some ten years. In 1875 he came to Madisonville, where he opened a shop and commenced repairing and manufacturing wagons, continuing alone for some two years he then had a partner, R. Q. Robinson, for, two years, after which he worked for Capt. T. B. Jones three years. In January, 1883, he commenced the manufacture, of wagons on a large scale in company with A. A. Riggin, under the firm name of Riggin & Daves. He was, married June 11, 1869, to Miss Mary E. Davis, a native of Hopkins County, Ky., and daughter of William Davis, one of the early settlers of the county. Six children blessed their union, five of whom - four sons and one daughter - are yet living. Mr. Daves is a member of the Baptist Church, and of the K. of H. In politics he is identified with the Greenback party.
Davis
Earle
Baker
Baley
HON. ELDRED G. DAVIS, M. D., was born in Hopkins County, Ky., June 5,1832, and is the seventh in a family of eight children, born to William and Anna (Earle) Davis, natives of Mississippi, and of English descent. William Davis, when but a boy, and while Kentucky was yet a county of Virginia, came with his parents to what is now Hopkins County, KY., then almost an unbroken wilderness, where his father, Richard Davis, bought about 2,000 acres of military lands, about nine miles south of the present site of Madisonville, where he erected -a rude log-cabin, and subsequently improved a farm. He afterward built the first brick house in Hopkins County, Ky. William Davis was a veteran in the war of 1812, serving throughout that struggle under Gen. Harrison; after the war be returned to Hopkins County, where he was married, and where his father gave him a farm on which he resided until his death in 1849 or 1850, in about his sixty-second year. Our subject, Eldred G. Davis, received a good common education, and afterward graduated in the English and scientific course at Shurtleff College, Alton, Ill. In 1853 he commenced the study of medicine under Dr. Peter J. Baley, of Adairville, Logan Co., Ky., and in the spring of 1855 graduated with high honors from the Nashville Medical College. That same spring he commenced the practice of his profession near Madisonville, where he remained until the breaking out of the late war, when be removed to the town of Madisonville, where he remained until 1873, having an extensive practice. In 1873 he came to Earlington, being induced to do so by the St. Bernard Coal Company. Here he became physician for that company and also has a large and lucrative practice outside. In 1880 and 1881 be represented Hopkins County in the lower house of the Kentucky legislature. He was married, in 1855, to Miss Susan V. Baker, a native of Hopkins County, and daughter of William R. Baker, who was sheriff of the county for a number of years. One son and one daughter have blessed this union. The Doctor is a member of the I.0.0.F. In politics he is a Democrat.
Davis
Woodruff
GEORGE M. DAVIS, Hopkins County, was born February 5, 1847, in Madisonville, Ky. He is a son of lsrael and Dicey (Woodruff) Davis, both natives of Hopkins County. The father died in April, 1880, aged sixty-six. The mother now lives with her son at Morton's Gap. Our subject received a good common school education in youth, and at the age of twenty-one commenced for himself at farming, and continued seven years. In 1876 he came to Morton's Gap, and engaged in general merchandising; this business he has successfully carried on ever since, and is now doing a business of about $12, 000 a year. Mr. Davis is also. agent for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and Southern Express Company at this point having been agent for the railroad company for the past five years. He was married in 1867 to Mary J. Davis of Hopkins County; this union has been blessed with two children - one son and one daughter. Mr. Davis is a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Davis is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Davis
Jones
Williams
ISAAC DAVIS was born in South Wales, September 28, 1847, and is the youngest of a family of four children born to John and Sarah (Jones) Davis, both natives of Wales. John Davis in the early part of his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. He afterward worked as a laborer in a smelting furnace in South Wales for a number of years. Still later he engaged in contracting, preparing material for an iron company, which he continued until his death, September 3, 1879, in his seventy-seventh year. Both he and wife were members of the Independent Church; he was also a member of the order of Foresters. Isaac Davis was employed with his father in the iron works until he attained his majority. In April, 1870, be immigrated to the United States, first settling in Coalton, Ky., where be remained about four months; then he came to Earlington, Hopkins Co., Ky., where he engaged in coal mining for about two years. He then opened a saloon, at the same place, which he conducted for some six years. In 1878 he opened a dry goods store at Earlington, and has since been doing a flourishing business in that line. He carries a large and well selected stock of dry goods, amounting to about $9,000, his average annual sales amounting to at least $12,000. Mr. Davis was married January 11, 1883 to Miss Necie W. Williams, a native of Christian County, Ky. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of the I.0.0.F., having taken the Encampment degrees. He is a Democrat.
Davis
Herrin
Goodloe
W. D. DAVIS was born September 15, 1820, in Hopkins County, Ky. He is a son of Joseph and Lucy (Herrin) Davis, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of South Carolina. They immigrated to Hopkins County at an early day, and engaged in farming. The father died in December, 1869, aged seventy-four. Our subject at the age of twenty-one worked on his brother's farm one year; he then bought a farm of fifty acres, and has since engaged in farming; he added other lands as his means would allow, and now owns about 400 acres, also his residence in Madisonville, all of which he has acquired by constant application to business. Mr. Davis was married in 1845 to Jane Goodloe of Hopkins County. These parents have had four children, three of whom am living - two sons and one daughter. Mrs. Davis is a member of the Christian Church.
Davis
Woodruff
Graddy
WILLIAM M. DAVIS was born March 23, 1840, in Hopkins County, Ky., and is a son of Israel and Dicey (Woodruff) Davis. He enlisted in October, 1861, in Company A, First Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate States army, and served three years. He participated in the battle of Fort Donelson, and is said to have been the first to fire a gun on the enemy. There he was taken prisoner and confined six months at Camp Morton, after which he was taken to Vicksburg, and there exchanged. He then joined Wheeler's command and two months later was discharged on account of physical disability. He returned, to Hopkins County and soon after went to Illinois, where he remained about eighteen months, after which he returned and settled on his present farm, which consists of 155 acres, about 100 of which are under cultivation. He was married January 5, 1865, to Helen J. Graddy, of Hopkins County; this union has been blessed with two children, one son and one daughter. Mr. Davis is a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Davis is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.
Dillingham
Oates
Earle
Yeargin
Bennett
EPHRAIM R. DILLINGHAM was born in Muhlenburgh [sic] County, Ky., December 11, 1833, and is a son of Vachel L., and Elizabeth (Oates) Dillingham, natives of South and North Carolina, of English and Irish descent, respectively. When only a small boy, in the latter part of the last century, Vachel L. Dillingham was brought by his parents to Christian County. Here his father, Jesse M. Dillingham, located military land and subsequently improved a farm, upon a part of which the town of Hopkinsville was afterward built. He was for several years surveyor of Christian County; after his wife's death he lived with his children and relatives in Kentucky and Illinois until his death, which occurred at the home of his son Vachel L., near Greenville, Muhlenburgh [sic] Co., Ky., in about his eighty-seventh year. Vachel L. Dillingham, after his mother's death, which occurred when he was only six or eight -years old, lived with his uncle, Jackson Earle, who resided at the Pond River Ferry, in Muhlenburgh [sic] County. He remained with his uncle until his marriage when he bought a farm near Greenville, where he resided, until his death, in August, 1852, in his fifty-eighth year; he was sheriff of Muhlenburgh [sic] County eight years. Ephraim R. Dillingham was employed on his father's farm until the latter's death, after which he came to Hopkins County, and bought wild land near White Plains, moved into a log-cabin and subsequently improved the farm on which he now resides, and which is one of the best improved farms in the neighborhood. He has added to his original purchase from time to time, now owning 230 acres. After his father's death his mother made her home with our subject until her death, July 25, 1884, in her eighty-fourth year. She was for over fifty years a devoted member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Dillingham was married, April 30, 1858, to Miss Mary J. Yeargin, native of DeKalb County, Tenn., and a daughter of John and Judy (Bennett) Yeargin, natives of Virginia and North Carolina respectively, and of English descent. To Mr. and Mrs. Dillingham have been born six children, five of whom - three sons and two daughters - are living. Mr. Dillingham and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South; the children, all except one, belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Dillingham is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, and has held various official positions in his lodge. In politics he is a Democrat.
Dobyns
Oden
Wheeler
Morgan
Rice
WILLIAM L. DOBYNS, Hopkins County, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., November 25, 1838, and is a son of Thomas E. and Amanda A. (Oden) Dobyns, the former a native of Christian County, Ky., and the latter of Rutherford County, Tenn., of French descent. Thomas E. Dobyns was educated in his native county. When a young man he removed to Tennessee, where he was married, and where he carried the mail for a time, and afterward engaged in farming for four years. In 1844 he returned to Christian County, Ky., where he resided for some four or five years, and then came to Hopkins County. Here he bought a farm near White Plains, upon which he resided for three years, when he sold and bought another in the same neighorhood [sic], where he died August 9, 1854, in his forty-eighth year. William Dobyns was employed on his father's farm until he attained his majority. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Company I, First Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry, Confederate States army, which was eventually transferred to Gen. Wheeler's command. He served one year, after which he re-enlisted in the Tenth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry, and served under Gen. John H. Morgan until the command was captured near Buffington's Island in southern Ohio. He was then retained as a prisoner of War at Camp Morton, Indianoplis [sic], and Camp Donglas, Chicago, for eighteen months, and was exchanged in February, 1865. He participated in the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and Perryrille as well as many lesser engagements. After the war he returned to Kentucky, and was engaged in farming on the home place for about three years. He was then employed ed [sic] as a salesman in a general store for M. Rice for nearly two years, after which he was engaged in the tobacco trade at White Plains for two years. He then removed to northern Texas, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for another year, after which he returned to Hopkins County, Ky., where he was engaged in farming and the tobacco trade for two years, and for the next four months had charge of a Granger's dry goods and grocery house at White Plains. In 1878 he opened a general store on his own account, at the same place, where he has since been doing a flourishing business. He is also quite extensively engaged in the tobacco trade. In 1878 he was elected county assessor of Hopkins County, by a larger majority than any other officer had ever before received. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics a Democrat.
Dockrey
Mock
Chapple
W. T. DOCKREY was born October 26, 1854, in Hopkins County, Ky. He is a son of A. and Mary (Mock) Dockrey. The father was born in North Carolina, and when a child came with his mother to Hopkins County, Ky., where he has since resided, now living on his farm in the Dalton District. The mother is also a native of Hopkins County. Our subject was reared on his fatherís farm, and at the age of seventeen went to Charleston, where he attended school about one year. He then entered a store there as clerk, and remained about two years. In 1876 he came to Dawson and opened a grocery store; this he continued two years, after which he engaged in farming two years; he then returned to Dawson and has since been engaged in the hotel and liquor business. He owns the property known as the "Southern Hotel," which is conveniently located near the depot. Guests visiting this house will receive good accommodations at reasonable prices. Mr. Dockrey was married in 1875 to Josephine Chapple, of this county; this union is blessed with one bright daughter - Ora M.
Dukes
Moore
Hill
DAVID M. DUKES, Hopkins County, was born in Muhlenburgh County, Ky., March 6, 1838, and is a son of Josiah and Nancy Moore Dukes, natives of South Carolina and of English descent. When but a boy, Josiah Dukes came with his parents to Muhlenburgh County, Ky. Here his father, Benjamin Dukes, bought wild lands, erected a log-cabin, and subsequently improved a farm, upon which he resided until his death. Josiah Dukes, after his marriage, inherited his father-in-law's old homestead, where he was engaged in farming and stock raising until his death in March, 1883, in his eightieth year. He and wife were devoted members of the Baptist Church. David M. Dukes, after attaining his majority, was engaged in various pursuits for two years. He then farmed on shares for some seven or eight years, after which he bought a farm in Christian County, Ky., where he remained four or five years, when he lost his farm in consequence of a defective title. In December, 1878, he came to Hopkins County, where he rented for one year. He then bought the farm near White Plains, upon which he now resides. He was married January 25, 1860, to Miss Nancy J. Hill, a native of Muhlenburgh County, Ky. Ten children were the fruit of this union, of whom five sons and four daughters are living. Mr. Dukes and wife and four of their children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Democrat.
Dulin
Myers
Williams
Clements
R. S. DULIN, Hopkins County, was born August 26, 1837, in Christian County, Ky. He is the son of Rice and Catharine (Myers) Dulin, both natives of the same county and State. The mother died in 1875, aged sixty-two. The father is now living on his farm in Christian County. At the age of sixteen our subject came to Hopkins County, and here assisted his brother on his farm. In 1859 the brother died, but R. S. still continued to carry on the farm until the close of the war, after which he went to Evansville, Ind., and was engaged in the hotel business six or eight months; he then returned to the farm and bought out his brother's interest, and continued farming there for several years; he then moved to a point near Nortonville, and there carried on farming and milling. In March, 1877, he moved to Morton's Gap, and, in company with Chesley Williams, engaged in the saw-mill business, which they have since continued. They own a tract of 1,320 acres with this mill, also houses and lots at the "Gap," and property elsewhere. Mr. Dulin was married, in 1860, to Miss Mary Clements of Hopkins County; this union has been blessed with five children - three sons, Walter J., Hanson L. and Robert S., and two daughters, Kate C. and Mollie E. Mrs. Dulin is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.