Ballard County, Kentucky


Bible Records

The birth dates were taken from the John William Clark family Bible.  They were recorded by John William Clark. The deaths I researched plus mother had a record of most of them in our family Bible– they are accurate.  

Children of John William Clark & Zora Lonus (Harper) Clark:
All children born in & around Bardwell, KY


Child:                         Birth                Death                   Spouse

Willia V.                         09/22/1902         03/25/1985         Jesse Elbert Deweese D: Jan. 21, 1985     

Vertie Ella                       09/01/1906         02/22/1936         Silas Shelbourne  B: March 1900:  D: 03/11/1976

Nola Oneida                    05/00/1907        01-29-1992         Willie O. Minton: B: 28 Feb 1907;  D;:Oct. 1998)

Velma Gladys                 01/20/1910         02/11/1999         Other W. Edging: B: 16 Jan 1920; D: May 23, 1956

Ressie (Resa) May          03/19/1914         Stillborn

Thomas Uriah                 09/10/1915         10/17/1972         Lucille (died May 2008)

Baker Wilson                  04/23/1918         11/19/1986         Bertha Stovall (sister of Cecil Stovall)

Mary Alice “Phoebe”      02/25/1921         04/03/1985         Cecil Stovall – Bob Spears

John Marshall “Jack”      07/24/1925           Living               Mary  Stovall (deceased) – Jean ____ living spouse

Submitted by:  Janace


Church Records & Histories

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Surname Registry

Researchers with family from Ballard County... A growing collection of Surnames.

You are invited to send your info to be added to the registry, as well as photos and other family information you would like to share.

Click HERE to submit your names to the registry.
Surname
Submitted by
Timeframe
Robertson
ca 1840s-1850s
Dowdy
ca 1840-1950
Sullivan
ca 1840-1950
Stone
ca 1840-1950
Lee

Stone

Presley

Swain

Dorsey
ca 1875-1890
Burrow
ca 1875-1890
Morgan

Beard

Dowdy

Greer

Morris

Payne

Reeves

Holt

Duke

Myers

France

Thompson

Houston

"A History of Kentucky Baptists"
by J. H. Spencer

(excerpts relating to Ballard County, KY)

Plus additions from other publications as identified.


[Vol II, pp. 471-488] "West Union Association:  In no portion of the county have Baptists had more confusion or strife in establishing themselves, than in that part of Kentucky and Tennessee, lying west of the Tennessee River, and known in the early times as the Western District or Jackson's purchase. In the southern part of the territory, the early churches were planted principally by preachers from the Red River Association, and were consequently hyper-Calvanistic and anti-missionary in sentiment. Those in the northern part were gathered by ministers from southern Illinois, and from Little River and Highland Associations of Kentucky.... [p. 472] In 1843, messengers from the following ten churches, as nearly as can be ascertained, met at Gum Spring, in McCracken county: Wadesboro, West Fork of Clark's River and Sinking Spring in Calloway county, Gum Spring and Ohio in McCracken, Trace Creek, Mayfield and Little Obion in Graves, and Emmaus and Clinton in Hickman....formng a new association called Union Association of United Baptists [later changed to West Union Association of United Baptists]. [p. 472] When the association met at Hopewell in Ballard county in 1843, it numbered 29 churches with 1,474 members.... [p. 479] Ohio [church] in Ballard [was constituted] in 1833; Hopewell in Ballard, in 1835...."

from A History of Baptists in Kentucky By Frank M. Masters, 1953:
"The Graves County Association of Baptists was constituted in the Mayfield Baptist Church on November 22, 1893 of messengers from the following twenty-six Baptist churches, located in Graves County, Kentucky: Bethany, W. F. Lowe, pastor; Boydsville, Charles Bell, pastor; Cuba, J. L. Perryman, pastor; Chapel Hill, W. J. Nowland, pastor; Clarks River, E. H. Whitt, pastor; Dublin, W. H. Williams, pastor; Enon, T. L. Shelton, pastor; Emanuel, J. K. Kesterson, pastor; Farmington, Oak Grove, Wingo, and Sharon, T. B. Rouse, pastor; Little Bethel, J. R. Stewart, pastor; Little Obion, J. Bell, pastor; Mayfleld, A. S. Pettie, pastor; Hopewell, E. H. Whitt, pastor; Hickory Grove, A. H. Murphy, pastor; New Concord, W. F. Lowe, pastor; New Liberty, J. B. Henry, pastor; Pryorsburg, no pastor; Sand Hill, E. H. Whitt, pastor; Trace Creek, H. E. Hogan, pastor; Mt. Pisgah, no pastor; Lebanon, no pastor; Backusburg, no pastor; Liberty, H. K. Thomas, pastor; Mt. Olivet, J. E. Hogan: pastor; Pleasant Grove, W. F. Lowe, pastor; Water Valley, W. F. Matheny, pastor.
      An opening devotional service was conducted by Elder A. S. Pettie, pastor of the Mayfield Church. A temporary organization was then formed. W. P. Harvey of the Western Recorder, and J. W. Warder, Corresponding Secretary of the Baptist State Mission Board, were appointed reading clerks, and the messengers from the churches were enrolled. The permanent organization was completed by electing Elder W. F. Lowe, Moderator, Stephens Elmore, Clerk, and Marshall Wilson, Treasurer of the minute fund.
      The forming of the Graves County Association was preceded by action taken in the forty-fourth annual session of the Mt. Olivet Association with the Mt, Olivet Church, October 5-7, 1892. The Mt. Olivet body was constituted July 1848 of churches, which split off from the West Union Association over the T. L. Garrett controversy.! This Association adopted the following resolution at the session referred to above:
      "Whereas, the territory now occupied by this Association, and our sister, the West Union Association, is unequally divided;
      "Whereas, we believe that the cause of Christ would be advanced, and God glorified, in a better division of territory;
      "Resolved, therefore. That the territory now occupied by the two associations be so divided as to make three associations. This division to be made as follows: The churches of Graves County to compose one association; the churches of McCracken and Ballard Counties to compose the second; the counties of Carlisle, Hickman, and Fulton to compose the third...."

"The West Kentucky Baptist Association was constituted October 12, 1893 at the Bardwell Church. Elder T. H. Pettit was elected temporary Moderator, and Elder W. D. Nowlin, temporary Clerk. Messengers from the following churches gathered for the purpose of forming a new Association: Arlington, Bardwell, Bethlehem, Berkley, Hopewell, Clinton, Columbus, Emmaus, Fulton, Liberty, Mayfield Creek, Milburn, Mississippi, Mt. Carmel, Mt. Moriah, New Bethel, New Hope, Pleasant Ridge, Pleasant Valley, Poplar Grove, Shiloh, Spring Hill, South Ballard, Hickman, Obion, and Zoar. The Convention proceeded to elect permanent officers, which resulted in Elder J. N. Hall, Fulton, becoming Moderator, and Elder Martin Ball, Clerk. The name "West Kentucky" was selected as the name of the Association, and a constitution and Rules of Decorum were adopted. The clerk was authorized to fill in the names of all the standing committees."  from A History of Baptists in Kentucky By Frank M. Masters, 1953

[p. 480] "Among the early ministers of this body [West Union Association] were James P. Edwards [In 1843, he moved to Ballard county and joined the Little Obion church and although he subsequently moved away, he later moved back and in 1851 moved to Lovelaceville where he spent the remainder of his life],  Elder James Edwards, after laboring for over fifty years in the vineyard of the Lord -- a faithful, God-fearing, toiling servant -- died in 1855, in Ballard county, Kentucky, at the advanced age of seventy-five, and the last year of his life found him still preaching the gospel, regularly." from History of the Bethel Association, Missouri
By William Polk, 1856.  Stephen Ray, E.A. Daniel, M. S. Wymans [(p. 591 - 592) born in Henry county, Ky, in Aug ust 27, 1808, orphaned young, he married Elizabeth Tharp and was baptized at New Hope church in Washington county, by Isaac Taylor. He was a missionary preacher for three years and visited most of the churches in the Association. He later moved to Graves county and joined the Emmaus church on the Ballard border and was later ordained.], James Bone [raised up to the ministry in Mississippi church in Ballard county in about 1842]. James Bone (p. 483) was a useful young preacher in this Association, a few years, He appears to have been raised up to the ministry in Mississippi church in Ballard county, about 1842. He was a young preacher of fine gifts, and was an active and zealous laborer in the Master?s vineyard. After preaching two or three years, he attended school, perhaps at Georgetown College, about two years. He moved to Missouri in 1848. H. H. Richardson [born in Tennessee in 1808, he united with the Ohio Baptist church, in Ballard county, Ky, was baptized by James P. Edwards, and was ordained in June 1836 by Durin Alcock], and Joseph Ashbrook." Henry H. Richardson (p. 483) was born in Stewart county, Tenn., about 1808. In early life, he professed conversion, and united with the Cumberland Presbyterians, among whom he preached several years. In 1835, he united with Ohio Baptist church in Ballard county, Ky., and was baptized by James P. Edwards. He was ordained to the ministry, in June, 1836, by Durin Alcock [p. 484] and Lewis Goad. In this region of country, he labored with great zeal and success, about ten years, when he moved to Union county, Ill., where he has been eminently useful. He was still living, in 1882." "The minutes of West Union Association for 1844 show Elder Henry Richardson to be a member of and messenger from Ohio Baptist Church, Ballard County, Kentucky. from History of the First Baptist Church, Mayfield, Kentucky, By Wendell H. Rone, Sr., 1973. Willis White [who moved to Ballard in 1833 after his marriage, and was baptized by James P. Edwards in the Mayfield church, in 1834 he was licensed to preach in the Ohio church, and ordained in 1836 at the same time as H. H Richardson by Durin Alcock, and Lewis Goad. White and Richardson preached together and gathered Mississippi church in 1840; Sugar Creek (later Lovelaceville) church in 1841; and Newton's Creek [later Spring Bayou] in 1842. He also helped James P. Edwards gather other churches, including Paducah in 1840.]  [p. 485]  Willis White, (p. 484) who, though far advanced in years, is still living, was in the constitution of West Union Association, and has been one of the most active and useful ministers in that fraternity. He was born in Halifax county, N. C., February 26, 1805. He was brought to Nashville, Tennessee, in his mother's arms, and, in 1809, his parents settled in Caldwell county, Ky. Here he was brought up on a farm, receiving a moderate common school education. In 1824, he moved with his parents to Hickman county, and, after his marriage, settled in Ballard county; in 1833. During this year, he professed hope in Christ, and, on the 8th of October, was baptized into the fellowship of Mayfield Creek church, by James P. Edwards. In the Spring of 1834, he was licensed to preach, by Ohio church, and, in June, 1836, was ordained to the ministry, by Durin Alcock and Lewis Goad, H. H. Richardson being ordained at the same time and place. The two young ministers preached much together, and, by their joint labors, gathered Sugar Creek (now Lovelaceville) church, in 1841, Mississippi church, in 1840, and Newton?s Creek (now Spring Bayou), in 1842. Mr. White also aided James P. Edwards in gathering Paducah church, in 1840, Mayfield, in 1843, and Humphreys Creek, in 1844. He also labored extensively among the destitute, sometimes in the employment of a missionary board, but much oftener, at his own charges. During his long ministry, he has, at different periods, been pastor of the following churches: Ohio, Sugar Creek and Newton's Creek, in McCracken county; Mayfield Creek and Liberty, in Graves; Columbus, Spring Hill and Clinton, in Hickman; Poplar Grove and Hickman, in Fulton; Metropolis, in Illinois, and Jackson, in Tennessee. During the last ten or twelve years, he has been school commissioner of Hickman county; but still preaches when his strength will permit. William E. Bishop (p. 484) was a good, faithful man, and a useful member of Hopewell church in Ballard county. He was also a prominent actor in the Association, and was associated with James P. Edwards in making the famous report concerning Paducah church, which was made the occasion of producing the chism in West Union Association, in 1847. Mr. Bishop was ordained to the ministry late in life, and preached only a short time. He was moderator of the Association during the three years preceding his death. The Lord called him home, about 1852. Also see BiographiesWilliam E. Bishop was ... a useful member of the Hopewell church, in Ballard county....and moderator of the Associatoin for the three years preceeding his death...about 1852.  Thomas Henry Porter, an older brother of the well known Elder D.N. Porter, M.D., of Eminence, Ky, and Elder Joseph P. Porter, of Kansas,... gave his membership to Hopewell church in Ballard county, where he was ordained to the ministry, in 1856." Thomas Henry Porter, (p. 484) an older brother of the well known Elder D. N. Porter, M.D., of Eminence, Ky., and Elder Joseph B. Porter, of Kansas, was a native of Virginia, whence he emigrated to Kentucky, and settled near Columbus in Hickman county. He gave his membership to Hopewell church in Ballard county, where he was ordained to the ministry, about 1856, being then considerably advanced in years. He was pastor of Wolf Island church in Mississippi county, Mo., and perhaps one or two others. His preaching gifts were below mediocrity; but his deep toned piety, his sound practical judgement and his manifest love of his race, gave him great influence over the people, and made him a valuable servant of Christ. He preached only a few years, before the Master called him to his reward..... William H. Porter, spent some years [p. 470-471] in the ministry, in Ballard county. His gifts were meager, but he was a man of eminent piety. He has been dead several years." Williams Baldry (p. 382-383) was born in Logan county, Ky., March 24, 1804. On arriving at manhood, he was married to Jane Hampton, August 26, 1826. This marriage was blessed with nine children, seven of whom survived their father, and were all church members. Mr. Baldry professed religion, at about the age of 30, and was baptized by Robert T. Anderson, into the fellowship of Hopewell church, in Robertson county, Tenn. Here he was ordained to the ministry in July, 1838, by Robert T. Anderson and O. H. Morrow. He soon entered the pastoral office, and in that capacity, served the churches at Hopewell, Keysburg, Allensville, Bethesda, Blue Spring and Battle Creek. He also labored as missionary of Bethel Association, for a short time. In 1849, he moved to Ballard county, Kentucky. Here he was pastor of the churches at Mt. Zion, Newton's Creek, Lovelaceville, and Salem. After laboring faithfully, and with a good degree of success, in the ministry, about 45 years, he fell asleep in Jesus, February 5, 1883. "
[p. 383] Association, for a short time. In 1849, he moved to Ballard county, Kentucky. Here he was pastor of the churches at Mt. Zion, Newton's Creek, Lovelaceville, and Salem. After laboring faithfully, and with a good degree of success, in the ministry, about 45 years, he fell asleep in Jesus, February 5, 1883. {Vol II, p. 382-383]  "Williams Baldry was born in Logan county, Ky, March 24, 1804....married Jane Hampton, August 26, 1826,....professed religion about the age of 30, and was baptized by Robert T. Anderson.... In 1844 he moved to Ballard county, Ky. Here he was pastor of the churches at Mt. Zion, Newton's Creek, Lovelaceville, and Salem. After laboring faithfully and with a good degree of success in the ministry, he ... [died] in February 5, 1883." Also, Vol. II, p. 284, W.S. Baldry, along with O.H. Morrow and Robert Williams, ordained A.W. Meacham, on Dec. 10, 1839. And, Vol. II, p. 186, William S. Baldry, William D. Baldwin and William Blumberlon ordained William Nowell Chaudoin at Marrowbone church in Davidson Co., TN, in 1851."

[Vol. II: p. 441-447] "J. N. Hall, the greatest debater in the Baptist denomination, was born in Pleasureville, Ky, Feb. 5, 1849. At the age of 7 he went with his parents to Ballard county, Ky, where he grew into manhood.... At the age of 14 he was converted, under the ministry of Elder C.L. Cate, and was baptized by the authority of Cane Run church, Ballard Co., Ky. Later he joined the Hopewell church, same county, where he was licensed to preach on the second Saturday in January 1871, and was ordained the second Sunday in January the same year....  He married Miss Mollie Earle on [p. 443] on the 6th day of July 1871, and after standing by his side in his great work, for twenty-eight years, she died December 12, 1899.... Mr. Hall (p. 487)was born in Henry county. Ky., Feb. 5, 1849, was raised up in Ballard Co. At the age of fourteen, he united with Cane Run church, was licensed to preach, at the age of twenty, and ordained in Jannary, 1872. He taught school, farmed, and preached to some country churches, till January, 1880, when he issued, at Fulton, Ky., the first number of the Baptist Gleaner. The paper has grown rapidly in public favor, and now has an extensive circulation in Western Kentucky and Tennessee. Mr. Hall has already taken high rank as a newspaper writer. He is also endowed with excellent preaching gifts, and devotes himself to the ministry with great zeal and activity."

"Why We Worship God on Sunday Instead of Saturday" by J. M. Hooker. Hooker pastored twelve different churches in Graves County, as well as other churches in west Kentucky. This article, which originally appeared in the Western Recorder, contains his arguments presented to a Seven Day Adventist preacher in Ballard County, Kentucky. " from Circular Letter To the Members of the J.H. Spencer Historical Society, Volume VI, No. 1 - Winter 2014 publisted n the baptisthistoryhomepage.com.

Henry Eugene Watters (p. 2189) was born on a farm in Graves county, Kentucky, in 1876, a son of Theodore M. Watters, who was born in Paducah, Kentucky, in 1853, and a grandson of John Watters, who was born in Yorkshire, England, and there reared and educated. John Watters when a youth served an apprenticeship in the trade of millwright, and at its completion came to the United States, locating in Kentucky, where he followed his trade for a number of years. On the breaking out of the war he entered the Confederate service, and after going south never returned and nothing is known of his end. He married Mary McReynolds, who was born in Graves county, Kentucky, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, she surviving her husband a few years. Henry Eugene Watters was born on a farm in Graves county, Kentucky, in 1876, a son of Theodore M. Watters, who was born in Paducah, Kentucky, in 1853, and a grandson of John Watters, who was born in Yorkshire, England, and there reared and educated. John Watters when a youth served an apprenticeship in the trade of millwright, and at its completion came to the United States, locating in Kentucky, where he followed his trade for a number of years. On the breaking out of the war he entered the Confederate service, and after going south never returned and nothing is known of his end. He married Mary McReynolds, who was born in Graves county, Kentucky, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, she surviving her husband a few years.
     Theodore M. Watters, the father, an only child, acquired a good education during his youth, and taught school a part of each year for several years. In the meantime he bought a farm a few miles from Mayfield, where he now lives, engaged in general farming and stock raising. He married Josephine Ransom, who was born in that part of Ballard county, now Carlisle, Kentucky. Her parents were Matt and Elizabeth
[p. 2190]
(Hall) Ransom. The Ransom family originally came from North Carolina, and the Halls from Virginia, of English descent. Theodore M. Watters and wife reared five children, namely: Henry E., Dorinda, Mollie, Eva and J. Matt.

from A Short History of the Graves County (KY) Baptist Association, By Wendell Rone, Sr.
Prior to the formation of Hickman County, on January 15, 1822, the Kentucky part of the Purchase was under the combined jurisdiction of Livingston and Caldwell Counties, as both bordered the eastern side of the Tennessee River in 1818-1830. Part of the Caldwell area became Trigg County in 1820, which also bordered the same river.
      Clark's River Church, organized on May 13, 1820, and the first church to be organized in the Kentucky part of the purchase, united with the Little River Association of Baptists on August 16, 1820, meeting with the Muddy Fork of Little River Church, being represented by Elder Henry Darnall and Licentiate Absolom Copeland, and reporting 13 members. The church continued to represent herself in this association through the 1823 session. Her total membership had climbed to 40 by that time.
      A second church, New Salem, located about two miles west of Murray, Kentucky, in Calloway County (after 1823), was organized in the year 1822, but it did not unite with any association until 1823.
      In July, 1823, Union Baptist Church (Wadesboro in 1828) was organized in Calloway County's seat of justice; becoming the third Baptist Church to be formed in the Kentucky Purchase. It, too, did not unite with an association until 1823.

2. Hickman County 1822-1835.
      The first two churches noted above were in Hickman County from January 15, 1822, to January, 1823, when Calloway County was formed. Hickman County consisted of the remaining area of the Kentucky Purchase west of Calloway County from January 15, 1823 until January 15, 1824, when Graves County was formed. No Baptist Churches were formed in the county in that period. With the loss of Graves County, and also of McCracken County (now both Ballard and McCracken Counties) on January 15, 1825, the county was reduced to what is now known as Fulton, Hickman, and Carlisle Counties. No Baptist Church existed in this area from January, 1822, until on December 10th, 1825, when the Mayfield Creek congregation was founded. Including the above church, the following churches were founded in the period 1822- 1835:

Mayfield Creek     December 10, 1825
Mud Creek*             1827
Bayou Desha*                 1830
Emmaus              August, 1832
Clinton            December 12, 1833
Hopewell           November, 1835

Current Churches

Antioch Baptist Church, Antioch Church Road, Barlow - part of the West Union Association

Bandana Baptist Church, College Drive, Bandana - part of the West Union Association

Barlow First Baptist Church, N. 6th, Barlow - part of the West Union Association

Bethlehem Baptist Church, Bethlehem Church Rd., Wickliffe - part of the West Union Association

Blandville Baptist Church, Bethlehem Church Rd., Blandville  - part of the West Union Association

Cane Creek Baptist Church, Slater Rd., Wickliffe  - part of the West Union Association

Faith Baptist Church, Barlow Rd., Wickliffe  - part of the West Union Association

Kevil Baptist Church, Kevil  - part of the West Union Association

La Center Baptist Church, La Center  - part of the West Union Association

Lovelaceville Baptist Church, Lovelaceville  - part of the West Union Association

Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, Mt. Pleasant Rd., La Center  - part of the West Union Association

New Hope Baptist Church, Monkey Eyebrow Rd., La Center  - part of the West Union Association

Newton Creek Baptist Church, Ogden Landing Rd., Kevil  - part of the West Union Association

Ohio Valley Baptist Church, Hazelwood Rd., Barlow - part of the West Union Association

Oscar Baptist Church, Oscar Rd., La Center  - part of the West Union Association

Providence Baptist Church, Monkeys Eyebrow Rd., Kevil  - part of the West Union Association

Southside Baptist Church, Oldham Rd., Barlow  - part of the West Union Association

Spring Bayou Baptist Church, Woodville Rd., Kevil  - part of the West Union Association

Wickliffe First Baptist Church, Tennessee St., Wickliffe  - part of the West Union Association